Mental Health First Aid – “World Mental Health Day 10th October”

Mental Health First Aid ACTION PLAN AGLEE A pproach, assess and assist with any crisis L isten non-judgementally E ncourage appropriate professional help E ncourage other supports The MHFA courses teach you how to give mental health first aid using the Action Plan. MHFA courses can provide members of the community with: Skills in how to recognise the signs and symptoms of mental health problems; Knowledge of the possible causes or risk factors for these mental health problems; Awareness of the evidenced based medical, psychological and alternative treatments available; Skills in how to give appropriate initial help and support someone experiencing a mental health problem; Skills in how to take appropriate action if a crisis situation arises involving suicidal behaviour, panic attack, stress reaction to trauma, overdose or threatening psychotic behaviour. Help someone you care about today ... https://mhfa.com.au/...

AUSTRALIAN CHILDHOOD FOUNDATION

The Australian Childhood Foundation works to save children from the trauma of child abuse, neglect and family violence in these ways: Our trauma teams help children families, carers and support professionals throughout Australia, including remote and regional areas. Their collaboration with a network of adults and organisations focuses on creating an environment dedicated to the recovery and healing of children traumatised by abuse, neglect and family violence. Help us to reclaim children’s most important possession: their childhood. Your donation will help us to ensure we can continue to support abused children to heal. https://netcommunity.childhood.org.au/donate Why We Exist Abuse costs the community up to $30 billion dollars a year. The Impact of abuse is life-long and affects us all. Traumatised children suffer throughout their lives, long after the abuse itself has stopped. Abuse and neglect impacts the brains of young children, shaping their behaviour and reactions to the world around them , leaving them ill-equipped to manage the demands of adulthood . Without specialist help and protection, the experience of abuse can become the starting point for a lifetime of struggle, confusion, conflict and breakdown. It can lead to depression, drug and alcohol addiction, violence, crime,mental illness and youth and adult suicide. The experience of child abuse and family violence rocks the very core of children. It undermines their self confidence and eats away at their self esteem. It makes them feel worthless and unlovable. Heart Felt a collection of children’s experiences and stories of abuse, recovery and hope The experience of child abuse and family violence rocks the very core of children. The abuse itself is often accompanied with messages that reinforce children’s vulnerability. They are often told that the abuse is their fault. They are told...

10 Tips For Coping With A Hyperactive Child

How To Help Children With Hyperactivity Problem By Lisa Fritscher Published September 12, 2007 http://www.lifescript.com/well-being/articles/0/10_tips_for_coping_with_a_hyperactive_child.aspx Coping with a hyperactive child can be tough. A hyperactive child can seem unstable, bouncing from activity to activity with seemingly limitless energy. He or she may appear to have difficulty listening or following directions. He may perform poorly in school, getting less than acceptable grades and demonstrating behavioral problems. While there is no right answer to handling a hyperactive child, following a few tips can make coping with a hyperactive child a bit easier to bear. Establish Order Many parents prefer to maintain a loose and relaxed household without an overabundance of rules. This laid back parenting style works well for many children. Hyperactive children, however, tend to have trouble in unclear environments. If you are coping with a hyperactive child, keep the household running in a clear and ordered manner. In this way, the child will know what is expected of him from day to day. Choose your Battles It is important that you decide which issues are worth fighting. A hyperactive child is not a “bad kid.” Hyperactivity is caused by a psychological disorder known as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. This is a problem with brain chemistry that affects the brain’s ability to pass information between brain cells. Therefore, it is not simply a matter of getting the child to see reason. Living within the constraints of daily life will be a struggle for him, so focus on the issues that truly matter and let other areas slide. Break Down Complex Instructions It is difficult for a child with ADHD to...

Twelve facts about child injury in Australia

CHILD ACCIDENT PREVENTION FOUNDATION OF AUSTRALIA Information for parents and caregivers – Kidsafe SA Inc. • September 2010 www.kidsafesa.com.au fact: one Unintentional child injuries are a major public health issue in Australia. Most can be prevented. Preventable injuries are higher amongst children compared with other age groups (ABS 2007). fact: two In 2005–2006, 22,865 children 0–4 years of age were admitted to hospital for injury across Australia. This was second only to admissions to hospital for respiratory conditions. Hospital isolation rates were higher for boys than girls. Hospitalisation rates for falls and poisonings were higher for children living in rural and remote communities, compared to children living in metropolitan areas (1.5 times greater for falls and 1.9 times greater for poisoning) (AIHW 2008). fact: three More children die from injury in Australia (36%), than from cancer (19%) and diseases of the nervous system combined (11%) (ABS 2006). fact: four – The main causes of child deaths from unintentional injury are: – Transport related (car crashes and driveway run-overs). – Drowning (in particular swimming pools). – Unsafe sleeping environments.  – Strangulation/suffocation (entrapment in a cabinet, strangulation by a window blind cord). – Crush injuries (large objects falling onto a child). fact: five Success has been achieved in injury reduction in Australia in a number of areas, with the number of child deaths declining by approximately 60% since 1983 (AIHW 2005). This reduction provides evidence that dramatic success in reducing child injuries and deaths is possible through the use of multiple strategies. These have included legislative changes, environmental changes, community action, information, education and training. There is still much work to be done. fact: six There is a strong association between age of a child, developmental stage, how the child interacts with their environment, the type of...

Understanding a Loved One’s PTSD

By Matthew Tull PhD – updated July 23 / 2009 – PTSD [Post Traumatic Stress Disorder] The symptoms of PTSD are the body’s attempt to cope with extreme stress. Recovery from PTSD can be a long and difficult road. A family’s support and understanding can be invaluable on your loved one’s journey to recovery. http://ptsd.about.com/od/infoforfriendsfamily/a/PTSDfamily.htm Coping with PTSD in family members can be a difficult thing to do. The effect of PTSD on family can be great. Studies have shown that families where a parent has PTSD are characterized by more anxiety; unhappiness; martial problems and behavioral problems among the children in the family as compared to families where a parent does not have PTSD. The finding is not entirely surprising. PTSD sypmtoms can cause a person to act in ways that may be hard for family members to understand. Their behaviour may appear erratic and strange or be upsetting. The Role of the Family – The family can either positively or negatively impact on the loved one’s PTSD symptoms. The first step in living with and helping a loved one with PTSD is learning about the symptoms of PTSD and understanding how these symptoms may influence behaviour. Symptoms such as:- Re-experiencing / Avoidance / Hyperarousal What can family Do? – A family can do a number of things to cope with a loved one’s PTSD. First it is important to understand that the loved one’s behaviour does not necessarily indicate his/her true feelings. That is; he/she may want to go out with friends and family but he/she is too afraid of bringing up upsetting thoughts and memories. It is important...